3 companies object to drugs' use in execution

Drugmaker Alvogen filed a lawsuit that went before a judge Wednesday seeking to prevent its sedative midazolam from being used in a lethal injection for twice-convicted killer Scott Raymond Dozier.

Three drug companies have now objected to Nevada's efforts to use their drugs to execute a man via lethal injection.

Drugmaker Alvogen filed a lawsuit that went before a judge Wednesday seeking to prevent its sedative midazolam from being used in a lethal injection for twice-convicted killer Scott Raymond Dozier.

Alvogen attorney Todd Bice says the state duped its regular pharmaceutical distributor, Cardinal Health, into selling the drug after Alvogen made clear that it opposed the use of its products in executions.

Assistant Solicitor General Jordan Smith says Nevada never tried to hide its purpose. He said Alvogen didn't have a contract in place with Cardinal Health that would have blocked the drug's sale for executions.

Cardinal Health did not immediately respond to phone or email requests for comment.

Sandoz, which produces other drugs Nevada plans to use in the execution, said it wanted to object to the procedure although it hasn't yet joined the suit.

Pfizer last year demanded that Nevada return its drugs that the state intended to use for the execution. Nevada has refused.

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